Musical Presentation

Musical Presentation

The Musical Directors from Northminster, Irvington, and Faith Presbyterian Churches will come together to do a musical presentation for your enjoyment. This presentation will offer vocal and instrumental music.   Date: Thursday, August 9, 2018 Time: 11:00 a.m. Northminster Presbyterian Church 1660 Kessler Blvd. E Drive Indianapolis, IN 46220...
A Conversation with Rebecca Henry, Director of Share

A Conversation with Rebecca Henry, Director of Share

When you speak with Rebecca Henry, it is not difficult to experience the compassion and conviction she possesses to make a difference in the world. Rebecca Henry is the director of Share, a summer program for youth 12-18 years old. Since 2013, she formed a non-profit to support students of Lawrence Township. Responding to a call from God, Rebecca stepped out in faith to provide a space of nurture, care, and empowerment for a segment of youth who were in need of community and grace. Through her fierce determination and perseverance, in collaborations with other congregations in the community, Rebecca has created a summer youth program that provides space for youth 12-18 years old to be physically engaged, educationally enriched, and sacred for community building. As pastor Charlotte Lohrenz and I walked into to speak with Rebecca at Castleton United Methodist Church, we witnessed a staff member from the Peace Learning Center speaking to students of Share about economic justice. These students were learning about the difficulties of financial management when living on minimum wage and what issues might occur that would challenge one’s ability to meet certain budget obligations. They were being asked to make financial choices based on a fixed income. How might one choose to spend money between getting medication for an illness or paying a bill for electricity? What would a student choose if the choice were between buying food to eat and getting gas to go to work? It was clear to me that Share was providing a safe place for students where they were challenged and nurtured to be their best selves. Rebecca...
PJ’s Sunday Blessing

PJ’s Sunday Blessing

It is a beautiful morning in Fishers, Indiana! The Sun is brightly shining in the sky and the Son is brightly shinning in our hearts as we prepare to worship our loving God. Today at Faith Presbyterian we tackle the difficult subject of hate. Why do some people find it so easy to dislike (or even hate) someone who is different from themselves? As Christians we remember when Jesus told us to Love God and to love our neighbors as we love ourselves. Jesus didn’t say this was an option, he said it was a commandment. Pray today that all can hear and understand that commandment. Think of what a wonderful world it would be if we all did! See you in church. PJ...

Violence breeds violence.  It’s a pattern described in scripture, recorded in the history of most cultures.  It’s what is experienced in our own time.  Revenge leads to revenge.  Retaliation produces retaliation. On and on and on and on. While it is undeniable that people of faith – including Christians – have committed terrible acts of violence in the name of God, there is a post-modern assumption that religion itself promotes violence.  We hear it so often from secularists that we almost fall for this straw dog. In fact, statistically, there is no evidence that faith – of any sort – is the genesis of most violence, including genocide and war. Sometimes the scriptures have been so routinely misinterpreted that we hear “violence” when there was no or at least less.  “Spare the rod and spoil the child” (Proverbs 13:24) has been routinely used to condone violence against children, ignoring that the proverb refers to the rod of the shepherd who – of course – would not use beat his sheep.  When Jesus says “you have heard it said an eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth” he isn’t referencing a passage that initially advocated retaliation.  The passages he mentions are in Leviticus and Deuteronomy and actually encouraged the practice of proportional justice.  (Leviticus 24:20; Deuteronomy 19:21). That is, the punishment should fit the crime not be greater than the crime.  Yet, Jesus is going father and putting aside that guidance in favor of meeting violence, cruelty or hatred with love. But it is undeniable that in Hebrew scriptures, God prescribes the death penalty in some instances (e.g....

Why are we tempted?  Because when we have encountered God as the Lord of our lives the Spirit drives us to a place where we know the difference between our own desires and the will of God.  Where we know, as Archbishop William Temple wrote: The worst things that happen do not happen because a few people are monstrously wicked, but because most people are like us. At stake are the people of God and the creation of God.  The temptations we face decide whether we will fill the stomachs of the hungry, how we will treat the strangers and the sojourners in our midst, whether the addicted will be rehabilitated, if the imprisoned will be visited and set free, whether the beauty and purity of God’s waters, skies, and earth will be restored, the lonely, sick and dying loved and cared for. When we live with God at a deep spiritual level we are sensitive to God’s presence in every area of our lives.  We know God’s claim not just our patterns of interaction with those we love but on our participation in the broader world, not just how we treat our friends but how we treat our enemies, not just whether we make healthy choices but if what we choose is healthy for all people.  We measure our lives by the standards of God’s kingdom and not by those of the culture we live in. These struggles emerge from our meaningful encounters with God in Jesus Christ. When we are tempted, we grow morally and spiritually. If we experience that inner tension of temptation and resist the...
Life Line Screening

Life Line Screening

Faith Presbyterian Church hosts a Life Line Screening to uncover risks for heart disease, stroke, and other chronic diseases. The event will take place on Monday, July 9 from 9am-4pm. For more information go to https://www.lifelinescreening.com/.
Share Summer Update

Share Summer Update

Happy Sunday! We could not have asked for a better week with our students! This past week they: Went Horseback riding Went fishing Participated in an introductory yoga class Played instruments with Arts For a Purpose Went Rock wall climbing Began our acting and improv class Continued our economic justice course Made high strides on our summer long art project Learned about resume building through our college prep course Took a campus tour at IUPUI Began our dance club with Khrissy Learned about the relationship between poetry and hip hop Packed snack packs and hygiene kits to give to Horizon House for those experiencing homelessness Next week we will continue with our weekly financial justice, community art, and music and dance activities as well as take our last trips to Ft Ben for fishing/horseback riding and to the Crux climbing wall. We will also have a guest speaker talk to students about becoming 21st Century Scholars, our service learning curriculum will explore causes, consequences and solutions and we will have several club activities for students to choose from as well! Looking forward to another great week with our students! To volunteer, donate, or learn more about this life-changing organization, go...
We’ve been to Binford Farmer’s Market

We’ve been to Binford Farmer’s Market

Getting know your neighbors isn’t all demographics, interviews, and getting the data right.  On Saturday, June 23, eight friends of Faith just walked the streets of the Binford Farmer’s Market.   Of course, some of us make a regular habit of marketing at the market.  Helen had to make an immediate trip to nab some rainbow chard, knowing it would run out quickly. Our job – besides shopping – was just to pay attention to who was present, engage in conversation and wonder about our community. We noticed: a lot of families with small children many – ahem – middle-aged people that the vendors were more ethnically diverse than the shoppers shoppers bought a lot of produce and not so much of the baked goods several organizations set up to get financial support many of the vendors are actually from very close to the church We wondered if: people with limit income would use the market, as produce is more expensive than at a large supermarket there is a program to assist people on SNAP to be able to purchase produce more economically people would purchase more if they had a chance to sample produce they aren’t familiar with Faith could have a presence at the market  to help people know about our congregation Turns out, taking photographs is a good way to start a conversation, which makes a good opportunity to say, “We are Faith Presbyterian up on 82nd and Hague and we are out getting to know more about our community.” When we headed home, Diane had some planting to do and I had an unorthodox breakfast.   ...
Jesus said: I am the resurrection and the life.

Jesus said: I am the resurrection and the life.

One of the gifts of General Assembly – the biennial gathering of the Presbyterian Church (USA) – is that it is a bit of giant family reunion.  As someone who has lived and served in multiple areas, it is a great chance to reconnect and catch up.  This assembly, in St. Louis, was extra fun for me because I got to introduce my daughter, who was a Young Adult Advisory Delegate (YAAD), to people she had only heard about but never met. Our first day, we ran into Peg True.  Peg threw up her hands and beamed a warm smile, a combination of gestures I have seen through the years of knowing Peg.  They are characteristic of her open-heartedness and welcome.  I introduced Peg and Rosina and we chatted about life and church. Peg was so interested to hear about what Rosina does apart from being a YAAD . Then she talked enthusiastically about the high school graduation she had just attended for one of her many and beloved grandnephews or grandnieces. As Rosina and I walked away, I told her about the amazing legacy the Peg has in the Presbyterian Church. She was one of the first women to be ordained as a Minister of Word and Sacrament. She had felt called as a young person, yet she was only ordained after many years of waiting and service because there was so little encouragement for women in the ministry for so long.   Peg was an educator and deeply committed to causes of social justice.  She greeted everyone with the same enthusiasm she had greeted us but carried within...
Binford Farmer’s Market

Binford Farmer’s Market

Walk the Binford Farmer’s Market Saturday, June 23 9-10 AM   On Saturday, June 23 from 9-10 AM, we will be walking the Binford Farmer’s Market. As part of our Community Engagement project, we will get to mingle with our neighbors and greet the vendors. Join us as we deepen our connection to our...